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Antipater
Macedonian Army General and Regent

 

Antipater (c. 398-319 B.C.), like Parmenio, his near contemporary, was older than Philip II and one of the most valued Macedonian generals. He was sent to Athens as ambassador in 346 and negotiated peace with the Athenians after Chaeronea. When Alexander set out for Asia Antipater was left in charge of Macedonia and Greece. Here he frequently found himself opposed by Alexander's mother Olympias, who undermined his position first with Alexander and later with Perdiccas. After Alexander's death Antipater commanded in Europe the Macedonian armies against the Greeks in the Lamian war, which had rebelled and drove out the Macedonian out of Greece. Antipater returned with much stronger Macedonian forces, decisively defeated the Greeks at Crannon, and reestablished the Macedonian occupation of Greece. A short while after the murder of Perdiccas he restored order to the Macedonian empire. His authority was accepted by the Macedonian troops in Asia, the command of whom he entrusted to Antigonus while he himself brought back the kings, Philip III and Alexander IV (the son of Alexander the Great), to Macedonia. His alliance with Antigonus was cemented by the marriage of his daughter Phila (the widow of Craterus) to Antigonus' son Demetrius. But by then Antipater was nearing eighty and this period of stability was cut short by his death in 319.

 

 
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