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Seleucus I
Macedonian King of Asia

 

 

Seleucus (c. 358-281 B.C.), son of Antiochus (one of Philip's generals), fought in the Companion cavalry and later became commander of the crack heavy infantry formation, the Hypaspistae. He took Perdiccas' side immediately after Alexander's death, but was later instrumental in his murder following the failure of the Egyptian campaign. Antipater appointed him governor of Babylon in 321. But in 316 Antigonus drove him out of Babylon and he fled to Egypt, where he joined Ptolemy in the war against Antigonus. He returned to Babylon in 312 and steadily extended his authority over the eastern provinces. After campaigning in India he made peace with the Indian ruler Chandragupta, receiving in return a corps of elephants which played a part in his 301 victory at Ipsus over Antigonus. At the partition of Antigonus' domains, Seleucus added Syria to his territories and founded his western capital at Antioch. In 285 his most threatening rival Antigonus' son Demetrius surrendered and in 281 Seleucus turned on his former ally Lysimachus. He invaded Lysimachus' territories in western Asia Minor and at the battle of Corupedium defeated and killed him. But when he crossed to Europe to claim Lysimachus' Thracian kingdom, he was assassinated by Ptolemy Ceraunus the son of Ptolemy I.

 

 
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